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Our Cellular Medicine Guide To Surviving The Year-End Party Season

The year-end party season is a time when even the most health-conscious people admit to sometimes overindulging by consuming too many calories and too much alcohol. Interestingly, research in many countries shows a clear seasonal trend of cardiovascular diseases, with the highest incidence occurring during the colder winter months. All the more reason, then, towards reducing your risk of heart attacks and strokes at this time of year, to take steps to ensure an optimum intake of essential micronutrients.

One reason we eat more when it is cold outside is that our body’s internal temperature drops. Our natural response to this is to feel hungry. Consuming calories warms up our body as it essentially adds energy to the system. During the party season, however, this can often result in our consuming the wrong foods, such as those containing trans fats; high levels of sugar, salt and artificial additives; and low amounts of essential micronutrients.

Most party tables are laden with pizza, French fries, potato chips. crackers, cakes, pastries, and cookies. Consumed in excess, such foods undoubtedly increase our risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. While the damage doesn’t happen overnight, if you regularly eat these types of foods during the holiday season, they can contribute to serious consequences for your health.

Research shows people eating at fast food restaurants underestimate the total number of calories in their food by up to 25 percent, and that about 90 percent of people underestimate how much salt (sodium) is in their meals. Along with a lack of exercise and excess consumption of alcohol, a poor quality diet significantly increases your risk of heart attacks and strokes.

There is also a clear link between micronutrient intake and depression. The vitamin-rich Mediterranean diet has been linked to a low prevalence of depression, for example, while fast food consumption has been found to increase the risk of developing and aggravating this disorder.

The Cellular Medicine approach to detoxification

Detoxification, often referred to as ‘detox’, is a process that the body undergoes naturally when removing harmful substances from its system. To carry it out efficiently, however, we need to consume the right foods to extract the necessary micronutrients and antioxidants from.

Dr. Rath’s Basic Cellular Health Recommendations can assist in detoxifying the body during the party season. Comprising a synergistic combination of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, antioxidants and trace elements, ensuring an optimum micronutrient intake can help reduce the risk of damage to your cardiovascular system and improve your chances of emerging from the party season unscathed!

The micronutrients contained in Dr. Rath’s Basic Cellular Health Recommendations include the following:

Vitamin C – A water-soluble vitamin that is the most important antioxidant in the body, vitamin C is the key nutrient for the stability of blood vessels, the heart, and all other organs. Responsible for the optimum production and function of collagen, elastin and other connective tissue molecules, Dr. Rath’s research has proven that a chronic deficiency of vitamin C is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease. Research shows that alcohol enhances excretion of vitamin C in the urine.

Vitamin E – The most important fat-soluble antioxidant vitamin in the body, vitamin E helps protect the membranes of the cells in the cardiovascular system. It also helps prevent the oxidative stress and free radical damage that can result from consumption of alcohol.

Beta-carotene – Also known as pro-vitamin A, beta-carotene is another important fat-soluble antioxidant vitamin. Along with vitamin E, it can help prevent fat particles from rusting and damaging the cardiovascular system.

Vitamin B1 – The cofactor for an important biocatalyst called pyrophosphate, vitamin B1 helps optimize millions of reactions that occur in the cells of the heart and other organs. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B1.

Vitamin B2 – The cofactor for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), one of the most important carrier molecules of cellular energy in the mitochondria (power plants) of the body’s cells, vitamin B2 plays a major role in the metabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B2.

Vitamin B3 – The cofactor for a substance called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) that is one of the body’s most important energy transport systems, vitamin B3 plays a critical role in maintaining the function of every cell in the body. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B3.

Vitamin B5 – The cofactor for coenzyme A, the central fuel molecule in the metabolism of the body’s cells, vitamin B5 plays a critical role in many of the reactions involving carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B5.

Vitamin B6 – The cofactor for pyridoxal phosphate, which plays an important role in the metabolism of amino acids and proteins in cells, vitamin B6 is also involved in sugar metabolism, the metabolism of essential fatty acids, and the metabolism of certain minerals such as magnesium. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B6.

Vitamin B12 – Needed for the proper metabolism of fatty acids and certain amino acids in the body, vitamin B12 plays essential roles in the production of red blood cells and the maintenance of the central nervous system. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in vitamin B12.

Vitamin D3 – Essential for optimum calcium and phosphate metabolism in the body, vitamin D is needed for the growth and stability of the bones and teeth. The D3 form of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) is the type made by the body when the skin is exposed to sunshine. Research suggests that overuse of sunscreen has caused a dramatic increase in the number of people with deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D. In the winter months, when there is not much sun and people spend more time indoors, supplementation becomes even more important.

Folic Acid – An important nutrient for the body’s production of red blood cells, folic acid also helps produce DNA, the building block of the human body, which carries genetic information. People who eat a lot of junk food are particularly likely to be deficient in this nutrient.

Biotin – Playing important roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, biotin has beneficial effects on hair and skin. People with a moderate to high intake of alcohol are at risk of being deficient in biotin.

Calcium – Important for the proper contraction of muscle cells, including those of the heart, calcium is also essential for the hardening and stability of our bones and teeth. It is also needed for proper biological communication among cells, including those of the cardiovascular system. Research shows that the concentration of calcium in the blood is lowered with increasing levels of alcohol.

Magnesium – Known as ‘nature’s calcium antagonist’, the benefit of magnesium to the cardiovascular system is similar to that of so-called ‘calcium antagonist’ drugs. The difference, of course, is that magnesium is produced by nature itself. Clinical studies have shown that magnesium is particularly important for helping to normalize conditions such as high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat. Research shows that the concentration of magnesium in the blood is lowered with increasing levels of alcohol.

Potassium – The most important positively charged electrical particle in the body’s cells, potassium is important for the generation of energy. It is also needed for the normal contraction of muscles, including the heart. Research shows that a high intake of potassium is associated with a lower risk of stroke.

Phosphorus – Present in all of the body’s cells, with most of it being found in the bones and teeth, phosphorus plays an important role in the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues. A particularly important mineral, it also helps the body make adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule used to store energy. Phosphorus also works with the B vitamins and helps with kidney function, muscle contraction, the heartbeat, and nerve signaling.

Zinc – Used by the immune system as an auxiliary factor (co-enzyme), a deficiency of zinc can lead to growth disorders, skin diseases, and an increased susceptibility to infections. People who consume diets that are high in fast foods are particularly likely to have insufficient levels of this nutrient.

Manganese – An important secondary factor for biocatalysts, manganese activates enzymes that play a part in the metabolism of DNA, the building block of the human body, which carries genetic information. A long-term serious shortage of manganese will result in growth inhibition, infertility, and other serious disorders.

Copper – Needed for the formation of a web structure of collagen in the blood vessel walls, copper also stimulates the absorption of iron and the production of hemoglobin, the red colored substance that is important for the red blood corpuscles. It is also needed for an enzyme that plays a key role in the production of melanin, the pigment that gives skin, hair, and eyes their color.

Selenium – An important antioxidant that protects the body against damage from free radicals and assists its defense systems, clinical studies have established that selenium plays important roles in the fight against cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Chromium – Playing an important role in the body’s carbohydrate metabolism, especially in connection with glucose and insulin, in most industrialized countries chromium deficiency is a secondary contributor to the growing incidence of diabetes.

Molybdenum – Acting as a cofactor for certain enzymatic reactions in the metabolism of cells, research suggests molybdenum may participate in the inactivation of some toxic substances in the body.

L-Lysine – A major building block of the stability proteins collagen and elastin, the amino acid l-lysine is very important for ensuring the health of the blood vessel walls as well as that of the body’s muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones.

L-Proline – Like l-lysine, the amino acid l-proline is major building block of the stability proteins collagen and elastin. It is very important for ensuring the health of the blood vessel walls as well as that of the body’s muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones.

L-Carnitine – A very important nutrient, l-carnitine is needed for the conversion of fats into energy. Many clinical studies have documented the great value of carnitine supplementation in improving the pumping function and performance of the heart.

L-Arginine – Through its role in the production of a molecule called nitric oxide, the amino acid l-arginine plays a powerful role in maintaining cardiovascular health. Nitric oxide relaxes the blood vessel walls and helps to normalize high blood pressure.

L-Cysteine – An amino acid that has many important functions in the body, the cardiovascular system particularly benefits from supplementation with l-cysteine. As a building block of glutathione, one of the most important antioxidants produced in the body, l-cysteine helps protect the inside of blood walls from free radicals and other types of damage.

Inositol – As well as being important for sugar and fat metabolism in the cells of the body, inositol is also important for the biological communication process between the cells and organs.

Coenzyme Q10 – Also known as ubiquinone, coenzyme Q10 functions as an extremely important catalyst for the energy center of each cell. Because of their high workload, the heart muscle cells have a particularly high demand for this micronutrient. In patients with insufficient pumping function of the heart, coenzyme Q10 is frequently deficient. An irrefutable number of clinical studies have documented the great value of coenzyme Q10 in treating heart failure and optimizing heart performance.

Bioflavonoids – Found in certain fruits, vegetables and other foods, bioflavonoids have potent antioxidant power. Synergistically enhancing the benefits of vitamins C and E, they help improve the immune system, protect the body from free radicals, and inhibit inflammation.

Feel free to contact us anytime for further information!
Mirja Holtrop

Mirja Holtrop

Mirja Holtrop was born and raised in Germany, where she studied Computer Science and Public Relations. After working as a Marketing Assistant for a couple of years she joined the Dr. Rath Health Foundation. In the early 2000s she moved to South Africa where she studied Education at the University of Cape Town. Her first book, ‘The Secret of Cells’, was published in 2004.

Since then, after spending 13 years in South Africa, Mirja has published five more books and moved back to Germany. Today, in addition to writing books, she works on the Dr. Rath Health Foundation’s international Movement of Life project.

Mirja loves organic gardening, cooking, and animals. She lives with her nine-year old son near Düsseldorf in Germany.
Mirja Holtrop wuchs in Aachen auf und studierte Informatik und Public Relations. Nachdem sie einige Jahre als Marketing Assistentin gearbeitet hatte, schloss sie sich der Rath Foundation an und ging nach Südafrika. Dort absolvierte sie an der Universität von Kapstadt ein Pädagogikstudium und publizierte 2004 ihr erstes Buch, “Das Geheimnis der Zellen.”

Nach 13 Jahren Südafrika und fünf weiteren publizierten Büchern - die sich alle mit dem Thema Gesundheit für Kinder und Jugendliche befassen – kehrte sie nach Deutschland zurück. Sie arbeitet immer noch für die Rath Foundation und engagiert sich für „Movement of Life“, deren Tochterorganisation.

Sie lebt mit ihrem 9-Jährigen Sohn nahe Düsseldorf, züchtet Biogemüse und setzt sich für den Tierschutz ein.
Mirja Holtrop
Mirja Holtrop
Mirja Holtrop was born and raised in Germany, where she studied Computer Science and Public Relations. After working as a Marketing Assistant for a couple of years she joined the Dr. Rath Health Foundation. In the early 2000s she moved to South Africa where she studied Education at the University of Cape Town. Her first book, ‘The Secret of Cells’, was published in 2004.

Since then, after spending 13 years in South Africa, Mirja has published five more books and moved back to Germany. Today, in addition to writing books, she works on the Dr. Rath Health Foundation’s international Movement of Life project.

Mirja loves organic gardening, cooking, and animals. She lives with her nine-year old son near Düsseldorf in Germany.
Mirja Holtrop wuchs in Aachen auf und studierte Informatik und Public Relations. Nachdem sie einige Jahre als Marketing Assistentin gearbeitet hatte, schloss sie sich der Rath Foundation an und ging nach Südafrika. Dort absolvierte sie an der Universität von Kapstadt ein Pädagogikstudium und publizierte 2004 ihr erstes Buch, “Das Geheimnis der Zellen.”

Nach 13 Jahren Südafrika und fünf weiteren publizierten Büchern - die sich alle mit dem Thema Gesundheit für Kinder und Jugendliche befassen – kehrte sie nach Deutschland zurück. Sie arbeitet immer noch für die Rath Foundation und engagiert sich für „Movement of Life“, deren Tochterorganisation.

Sie lebt mit ihrem 9-Jährigen Sohn nahe Düsseldorf, züchtet Biogemüse und setzt sich für den Tierschutz ein.
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