What the ‘ARV defendants’ don’t want you to know about ARVs – part 4
October 28, 2008
What the ‘ARV defendants’ don’t want you to know about ARVs – part 6
October 28, 2008

What the ‘ARV defendants’ don’t want you to know about ARVs – part 5

It takes 9 to 10 years from HIV infection to AIDS

The time from an infection by a micro-organism, e.g. virus, until the symptoms of the disease occur is called incubation or latent period depending on the nature of infection i.e. acute or persistent. The incubation time period for acutely-infecting viruses such as measles is 8 to 12 days and for influenza 1 to 5 days (!). In contrast, the period for development of disease symptoms following infection with a persistent virus such as HIV is 9 to 10 years [Morgan et al AIDS, (2002)16:597-603Veugelers et al Am Journ Epidemiol (1994) 140: 747-758Koblin et al Am J Epidemiol (1999) 150: 1026-1030].

An average incubation time latent period from HIV infection to the occurrence of AIDS symptoms of nine to ten years (!) is remarkable, to say the least. This is consistent with the conclusion that HIV infection is not the sole cause of AIDS and other factors associated with viral infection such as nutritional deficiencies must play an important role in AIDS development.

An average incubation time latent period from HIV infection to the occurrence of AIDS symptoms of nine to ten years (!) is remarkable, to say the least. This is consistent with the conclusion that HIV infection is not the sole cause of AIDS and other factors associated with viral infection such as nutritional deficiencies must play an important role in AIDS development.

It is a remarkable fact that neither the pharmaceutical companies nor the defendants inform the public about the extreme latent period of HIV infection. To the contrary, all the articles of the Defendants consistently refer to “HIV/AIDS.” By doing so, the defendants deliberately create the perception of a deadly threat to any HIV infected person, unless – so the defendants say – they take ARV drugs. The deliberate hiding of these important scientific facts is of little help to the people who tested HIV-positive, but the creation of a “fear factor” is a great impulse for the marketing of ARV drugs.

Important vitamins and minerals for people living with HIV/AIDS

Micronutrient Role Source
Vitamin A Makes white blood cells – essential for vision, healthy skin and mucosa, teeth and bone development. Protects against infection associated with accelerated HIV progression, increased adult mortality, increased mother to child transmission, higher infant mortality and child growth failure. All yellow and orange fruit and vegetables, dark green leafy vegetables, alfalfa, liveer, oily fish, dairy products and egg yolks
Thiamine Vitamin B1 Important for energy metabolism, supports normal vision and nervous system functions Whole-grain cereals, beans, meat and poultry and fish
Riboflavin Vitamin B2 Important for energy metabolism, supports normal vision, health and integrity of skin Milk, yoghurt, meat, green leaves and whole-grain cereals
Niacin Vitamin B3 Essential for energy metabolism, supports health and integrity of skin, nervous and digestive systems Milk, fish, eggs, meat, poultry, peanuts, whole-grain cereals
Vitamin B6 Facilitates metabolism and absorption of fats and proteins, helps to make red blood cells Sweet potatoes, white beans, maize, avocados, cabbage, whole-grain cereals, seeds, Brazil nuts, walnuts, eggs, leafy green vegetables, alfalfa, bananas, legumes, meat and fish
Folate Required for building new cells, especially red blood cells and gastrointestinal cells Liver, red meat, green leafy vegetables, fish, oysters, legumes, groundnuts, oilseeds, whole-grain cereals, egg yolks and avocados
Vitamin B12 Important for new cell development and maintenance of the nerve cells Red meat, fish, poultry, seafood, sardines, cheese, eggs, milk, whole-grain cereals and seaweed
Vitamin C Helps the body to use calcium and other nutrients to build bones and blood vessel walls. Increases non-haem iron absorption. Increases resistance to infection and acts as an antioxidant. Important for protein metabolism Citrus fruits (such as baobab, guava, oranges and lemons), cabbage, green leaves, tomatoes, sweet peppers, potatoes, yams and cooking plantains. Vitamin C is lost when food is cut up, reheated or left standing after cooking
Vitamin E Protects cell structures and faciliates resistance to disease Leafy vegetables, vegetable oils, peanuts, egg yolks, dark green vegetables, nuts and seeds, whole-grain cereals
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